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Archive for the ‘Roy Rogers’ Category

cowboy-and-the-indians-lobby-lrg

Two Gene Autry pictures, Sunset In Wyoming (1941) and The Cowboy And The Indians (1949), will be screened at The Autry in Griffith Park on December 27 at noon. What makes this a big deal is that The Cowboy And The Indians features Gene singing his song “Here Comes Santa Claus.” It’s a real solid Autry movie all around.

I’m working on an article on the film for ClassicFlix.com, and have really enjoyed digging into in the last week or so.

Now if someone would run Trail Of Robin Hood (1950)!

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Burts Montgomery 1

It’s making the news these days that Burt Reynolds is auctioning off tons of his belongings — memorabilia, art, awards and other stuff (including a pair of Roy Rogers’ boots) from throughout his career. Even his Golden Globe awards. Some say it’s an effort to save his home.

One thing’s for sure: Burt amassed a lot of cool stuff. One piece that got my attention is this statue by George Montgomery. I love coming across his work, from the statues to the furniture.

Burts Montgomery 2

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Cyber Monday

I’m not sure I get the whole Cyber Monday thing, but who cares when Warner Archive offers up an offer like this? Have at it, folks!

A recommendation, uh, let’s see — Randolph Scott in Carson City (1952).

There’s also a discount available at VCI. Go to vcientertainment.com. The coupon code VCIBF60 will get you 60% off. A recommendation: the absolutely essential Roy Rogers TruColor double feature of Under California Stars (1948) and Bells Of San Angelo (1947).

under cali stars

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roy-rogers_trigger1000

They say today marks the beginning of the Christmas season. Here’s Roy Rogers and Trigger in Trail Of Robin Hood (1950), making sure every kid gets a tree.

Around my house, this wonderful, charming 67 minutes is a holiday tradition. It goes well with egg nog, cookies and, of course, popcorn and Raisinets (not to mention one of Sir Galahad’s relatives).

There’s absolutely no way I can recommend this movie enough. And I’d like to say hello to Sis McGonigle herself, Carol Nugent.

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Let’s remember two of the best on their birthdays. Every year, I look forward to this post.

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Joel McCrea
November 5, 1905 – October 20, 1990

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Roy Rogers
November 5, 1911 –  July 6, 1998

You know how we have President’s Day to jointly commemorate Washington and Lincoln’s birthdays? We should make today Cowboy’s Day.

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Roy Rogers drinks

My wife came across these the other day. Keep a look out for ‘em—the Lasso Lemon Lime is terrific.

Of course, there’s also Duke Bourbon.

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Hellfire TC

So far, the great cinematographer Jack A. Marta has hardly been mentioned here. I’m ashamed and with today’s Wild Bill Wednesday, I’m taking care of it. So many outstanding movies. What Price Glory (1926). The Night Riders (1939). Dark Command (1940). Flying Tigers (1942). Hellfire (1949). Trigger, Jr. (1950). Spoilers Of The Plains (1951). The Last Command (1955). The Bonnie Parker Story (1958). Cat Ballou (1965). Duel (1971).

On that last one, Steven Spielberg’s breakthrough TV movie Duel, Marta’s experience shooting outdoors in the desert helped get the thing completed on its 10-day schedule.

Steven Spielberg (from the excellent book Steven Spielberg And Duel: The Making Of A Film Career): “Jack was a sweetheart. He was just a kind, gentle soul who you know had never worked that fast in his entire career; none of us had, and yet there was nothing he didn’t do or couldn’t do, and he really enjoyed himself.”

No offense to Mr. Spielberg, but I have a feeling Duel‘s 10-day shoot, though exhausting, was probably nothing new for Marta, who’d done beautiful work on Republic’s tight schedules, in both black and white and Trucolor, and worked on plenty of television shows like Route 66 and Batman.

When Elliott co-produced Hellfire (below) for Republic release, a film he saw as a very special project (and considered his best film), Jack Marta was the director of photography. Was he randomly assigned the job by Republic, or did Elliott request him after working together on The Gallant Legion (1948) and the Trucolor The Last Bandit (1949)? (I’m getting pretty good at finding new ways to sneak Hellfire into this blog.)

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