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Daniel B lunchbox

Since starting this blog and allowing myself to really wallow in 50s Westerns, it’s been interesting to note how many of the 50s Western “practitioners” made the move to television in the 50s and into the 60s. For them, it probably wasn’t a real decision — they simply went where the work was.

Daniel Boone (1964-70) is one of the programs that really benefited from the Western pedigree of its cast and crew. Boone was developed to leverage Fess Parker’s incredible popularity as Disney’s Davy Crockett. Fact is, the show was to be about Crockett, but Disney wouldn’t give up the rights.

Parker at Boone Forest

Shout Factory has released the show’s first season in a 6-disc Collector’s Edition — 29 episodes with bonus material. Making your way through the set, you’re immediately struck by the familiar names and faces. This first season, the only one not in color, supplements its regular cast — Parker, Patricia Blair, Albert Salmi, Ed Ames, etc. — with the likes of Claude Akins, Dan Duryea, James H. Griffith, Jay Silverheels, Robert J. Wilke, Michael Pate, John McIntire and Hank Worden. Directors include Joseph H. Lewis, George Sherman, Thomas Carr, Nathan Juran and George Marshall — who all some some outstanding 50s Westerns.  The first episode, “Ken-Tuck-E,” directed by Marshall, was written by Borden Chase and shot by Carl Guthrie. Quite an impressive bunch.

The set looks terrific, with print quality varying a bit from episode to episode — but solid overall. The extra stuff is well done. And as for the shows themselves, I’ve always felt this first season was stronger than what came later. But you know, Parker’s so likable, that hardly seems important. Recommended.

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Directed by Phil Karlson
Starring George Montgomery, Gale Storm, Jerome Courtland, Noah Beery, Jr., William Bishop, John Dehner, John Doucette, Jock O’Mahoney, George Chesebro

Raleigh’s Western Film Preservation Society has been at it since 1981, and their meeting this month features two of my favorites Western stars.

First up is Tim Holt in The Fargo Kid (1940). The second feature is Phil Karlson’s The Texas Rangers (1951), starring George Montgomery, Gale Storm and Noah Beery. It’s the 21st (that’s tomorrow, sorry for the short notice) at 6:45 at North Carolina State University’s McKimmon Center.

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Directed by Henry Hathaway
Starring John Wayne, Sophia Loren, Rossano Brazzi, Kurt Kasznar

Legend Of The Lost (1957) isn’t a Western, and it can’t hold a candle to some of the other pictures Wayne made with Henry Hathaway. But it’s certainly big and it was shot by Jack Cardiff in Technicolor and Technirama, so it should make for a great Blu-ray. And it’s coming from Olive Films in May.

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I just love this photo of John Ford sitting in Monument Valley in his Dodgers cap. When I posted it last year to mark the start of the baseball season, I decided it was going to become a tradition around here.

The Dodgers don’t play their first regular-season home game till April 12th, and I ain’t waiting that long. Go Dodgers!

Sierra Baron by Paolo Tarquini

Directed by James B. Clark
Starring Brian Keith, Rick Jason, Rita Gam, Mala Powers, Steve Brodie

Fox Cinema Archives has announced the Regalscope Western Sierra Baron (1958) for April release. If they get the aspect ratio right and offer up Alex Phillips’ cinematography in widescreen 2.35:1, this will be a very welcome release indeed.

The image above is the original Italian poster art by Paolo Tarquini.

Thanks to Paula for the scoop on this one.

Yellow Sky punch illus

Directed by William A. Wellman
Starring Gregory Peck, Anne Baxter, Richard Widmark, Robert Arthur, John Russell, Harry Morgan

Kino Lorber has announced that they’ll bring William Wellman’s Yellow Sky (1948) to Blu-ray here in the States sometime this year.

A dark Western take on The Tempest, it could serve as a prototype for the Westerns of the 50s. Every performance is note-perfect, and Joe MacDonald’s cinematography alone is worth the cost of the upgrade. Absolutely essential.

The illustration is by Robert Stewart Sherriffs for Punch magazine.

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Directed by Raoul Walsh
Starring Clark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jean Willes, Barbara Nichols, Sara Shane, Roy Roberts, Arthur Shields, Jay C. Flippen, Jo Van Fleet

The King And Four Queens (1956) is a movie I want to like more than I do. But when you’ve got Raoul Walsh directing Clark Gable (above) — and Lucien Ballard capturing it all in CinemaScope, there are plenty of reasons to watch. And plenty of reasons to snatch it up on DVD or Blu-ray when Olive Films puts it out in May.

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