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Archive for the ‘Jay Silverheels’ Category

A while back, I asked for Want Lists of the 50s Westerns still lost on the high-def trail. Here they are, presented in chronological order. The titles in bold are the ones that were brought up most frequently.

With the recent news about Fox/Disney’s lack of interest in their back catalogs appearing on shiny silver circles, getting this finished and posted seemed very timely. Many of these, mind you, haven’t even turned up on DVD yet.

The Virginian (1946)
Albuquerque (1948)
Coroner Creek (1948)
Whispering Smith (1948)
3 Godfathers (1949)
Colorado Territory (1949)

Hellfire (1949)
Streets Of Laredo (1949)
Ambush (1950)
Branded (1950)
Devil’s Doorway (1950)
The Nevadan (1950)
Saddle Tramp (1950)
Short Grass (1950)
Showdown (1950)

Trail Of Robin Hood (1950)
Across The Wide Missouri (1951)
Along The Great Divide (1951)
Apache Drums (1951)
Best Of The Badmen (1951)
The Great Missouri Raid (1951)
Inside Straight (1951)
Man In The Saddle (1951)
Red Mountain (1951)
The Redhead And The Cowboy (1951)
The Secret Of Convict Lake (1951)
The Texas Rangers (1951)
Westward The Women (1951)

Vengeance Valley (1951)
Warpath (1951)
The Big Sky (1952)
Bugles In The Afternoon (1952)

Hangman’s Knot (1952)
The Lawless Breed (1952)
The Lusty Men (1952)
The Naked Spur (1952)
Ride The Man Down (1952)
The Savage (1952)
The Story Of Will Rogers (1952)
Untamed Frontier (1952)
Ambush At Tomahawk Gap (1953)
Charge At Feather River (1953)
City Of Bad Men (1953)
Devil’s Canyon {1953)
Escape From Fort Bravo (1953)
The Great Sioux Uprising (1953)
Jack McCall, Desperado (1953)
Last Of The Comanches (1953)
The Last Posse (1953)
The Silver Whip (1953)
The Stranger Wore A Gun (1953)
Wings Of The Hawk (1953)

Tumbleweed (1953)
Apache (1954)
The Bounty Hunter (1954)
Cattle Queen Of Montana (1954)
The Command (1954)
Dawn At Socorro (1954)
The Law Vs. Billy The Kid (1954)
The Outcast (1954)
Ride Clear Of Diablo (1954)
Silver Lode (1954)
Wyoming Renegades (1954)
The Yellow Tomahawk (1954)
At Gunpoint (1955)
Chief Crazy Horse (1955)
The Last Frontier (1955)
The Man From Bitter Ridge (1955)
Shotgun (1955)
Smoke Signal (1955)
Tennessee’s Partner (1955)
The Violent Men (1955)
Wichita (1955)
Backlash (1956)

Dakota Incident (1956)
Fastest Gun Alive (1956)
Fury At Gunsight Pass (1956)
Great Day In The Morning (1956)
The Last Wagon (1956)
The Lone Ranger (1956)
The Maverick Queen (1956)
Reprisal! (1956)
Seven Men From Now (1956)
Stagecoach To Fury (1956)
Tribute To A Bad Man (1956)
Copper Sky (1957)
Domino Kid (1957)

Dragoon Wells Massacre (1957)
Hell Canyon Outlaws (1957)
From Hell To Texas (1958)
Frontier Gun (1958)
The Lone Ranger And The Lost City Of Gold (1958)
Face Of A Fugitive (1959)
Last Train From Gun Hill (1959)
No Name On The Bullet (1959)
Thunder In The Sun (1959)
Yellowstone Kelly (1959)
The Alamo (1960)
Hell Bent For Leather (1960)
Cheyenne Autumn (1964)
Firecreek (1968)
Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid (1973)

As this was being compiled, a few titles actually made their way to Blu-Ray, one of them being the exquisite new Wagon Master (1950) from Warner Archive.

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Sorry, kids, but the Dora movie coming out this week is really bogus. We all know The Lone Ranger already found the Lost City Of Gold. Unless, of course, somebody lost it again.

I’ll take Jay Silverheels over a CGI monkey any day.

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Directed by Lesley Selander
Produced by Sherman Harris
Written by Robert Schaeffer and Eric Freiwald
Based on the Lone Ranger legend
Cinematography: Kenneth Peach
Film Editor: Robert S. Golden
Music by Les Baxter

CAST: Clayton Moore (The Lone Ranger), Jay Silverheels (Tonto), Douglas Kennedy ​(​Ross Brady​)​, Charles Watts ​(​Sheriff Oscar​), ​Noreen Nash ​(​Mrs. Frances Henderson​), ​Ralph Moody ​(​Padre Esteban​), ​Lisa Montell ​(​Paviva​), ​John Miljan ​(​Chief Tomache​), ​Norman Fredric ​(​Dr. James Rolfe​), ​Maurice Jara ​(​Redbird​), ​Bill Henry ​(​Travers​), Lane Bradford ​(Henchman​)​

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I watched the Moore-Silverheels Lone Ranger features countless times as a kid (you could get complete Super 8mm prints of them) and always preferred the second one, The Lone Ranger And The Lost City Of Gold (1958). Seeing them again recently, and placing them within the context of the 50s Western as a whole, I still love them. And I’m still convinced the second one’s the best.

The Lone Ranger And The Lost City Of Gold would be the last time Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels played The Lone Ranger and Tonto. The TV series wrapped up in June of ’57, a year before this picture would open. Luckily, they were able to go out on a high note.

“Dear Santa, all I want for Christmas…”

It begins with a brief recap of The Lone Ranger origin, set to a cool song from Les Baxter (see the record above). This gives way to the prerequisite “William Tell Overture.” It’s a shame they didn’t head to the Iverson Ranch for a big-screen shot of Moore and Silver next to Lone Ranger Rock.

The plot’s a variation on a fairly common one — a group of Masked Raiders are searching for a series of medallions that reveal the location of a vast cave filled with Indian gold. The Lone Ranger and Tonto must prevent the Raiders from getting the last of the medallions and taking the treasure that belongs to the Indians.

Of course, one of the Raiders is Douglas Kennedy. It’s always a treat when he turns up in something. Ralph Moody is great as a padre. Noreen Nash is a woman in cahoots with the Raiders. Nash didn’t have a real stellar career, though she’s in an episode of The Lone Ranger, a Dragnet and the Tim Holt picture Road Agent (1952) — so who’s complaining? Lisa Montell ​plays ​Paviva​, a lovely Indian maiden. She’s a favorite of mine thanks to World Without End (1956). Then there’s a baby boy that seems to be played by a girl — given away by tiny little earrings.

Lesley Selander cranks up the action and violence a notch for The Lone Ranger And The Lost City Of Gold. As a kid, it drove me nuts that, on TV, Clayton Moore just shot the guns out of the bad guys’ hands. Here, he actually drills somebody. So does Tonto. There’s also a terrific fistfight towards the end.

Much of this was shot at Old Tucson, and it gives you a great view of the place. The climax has Moore, Silverheels, Kennedy and others sneaking around the small houses you’ve seen in all kinds of stuff. The beautiful San Xavier del Bac Mission is also featured. And while all the location work’s gorgeous and adds plenty of production value, the absence of the familiar Iverson rocks from the TV show is a bit jarring.

the_pittsburgh_press_tue__jun_17__1958_This picture was clearly meant for kids. But there’s something about The Lone Ranger and Tonto I find more appealing the older I get. Their friendship, their fairness and their ongoing fight for justice are things we all could use some extra exposure to. I love this movie.

The Lone Ranger And The Lost City Of Gold is pretty easy to find on DVD. The VCI release from years ago presents it in its original aspect ratio, though a non-anamorphic letterboxed version. It’s the best one around. I’d love to see both of these Moore-Silverheels features make their way to Blu-Ray.

Just realized, thanks to Bob Madison, that today is the anniversary of the first Lone Ranger radio broadcast (1933).

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The new year, and each and every morning, is getting off to a great start. COZI TV, which brings lots of cool old shows to NBC stations (5.2 here in Raleigh) has added four episodes of The Lone Ranger to their morning lineup.

What a great way to start the day, though it has really slowed down my morning routine.

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Directed by Ray Nazarro
Screenplay by Ray Buffum and DeVallon Scott
Director Of Photography: Ellis W. Carter
Film Editor: Aaron Stell

Cast: Gary Merrill (Brock Marsh), Wanda Hendrix (Ruth Lawrence), John Bromfield (Mike Daugherty), Noah Beery, Jr. (Gimpy Joe), Fay Roope (John Lawrence), Howard Wendell (Judge Baker), Robert Simon (Marshal Whit Collins), James H. Griffith (Warren), Richard Webb (Frank Gibbs), Peter Whitney (Grimes), John War Eagle (Chief War Cloud), Jay Silverheels (Black Buffalo), Clayton Moore (Stone)

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At only 65 minutes long, The Black Dakotas (1954) was clearly meant to fill out a double bill. But for a film that’s not all that noteworthy, there are a number of things about it worth noting.

First, there’s the cast. Gary Merrill, in his first Western, is the bad guy — a Confederate hoping to stir up things with the Sioux to keep Union soldiers tied up. He gets a lot of screen time for a villain, maybe because he’s far more interesting than the good guy (John Bromfield). Wanda Hendrix, Audie Murphy’s ex-wife, was about to retire from the movies (at least for a few years), and she’s fine here. Noah Beery, Jr. does what he can with a rather odd part. The great James H. Griffith doesn’t have a whole lot to do as one of the bad guys.

John Bromfield and Wanda Hendrix

More on the cast. The Black Dakotas was shot during the period when Clayton Moore left The Lone Ranger TV series (over a salary dispute, reportedly) and returned to B Movie character parts. Moore’s not listed in the credits, but he’s there. You’ll also see Jay Silverheels (Tonto to Moore’s Lone Ranger) as one of the Sioux chiefs. From Moore and Silverheels to Beery and Griffith, the characters actors run rings around the leads.

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Here, Ray Nazarro does what we’ve seen him do so many times — put together a brisk little movie that delivers in the action department. It seems like no matter how small the budget or tight the schedule, Nazarro delivers the goods, the same way Lesley Selander always does. Of course, having Ellis Carter as director of photography doesn’t hurt. Why isn’t Carter brought up more often? He shot The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), for God’s sake! He gives The Black Dakotas a much bigger look than you’d expect. An early sequence was shot on a cloudy day — at Iverson, I think — and Carter really makes a positive out of a negative.

Carter’s fine work is well presented (in widescreen) in Mill Creek’s 7 Western Showdown Collection, a two-DVD set that contains seven Westerns. All the pictures look terrific, and the price is hard to beat. Recommended. I hope Mill Creek keeps up the good work, and I’d love to see movies like this make their way to Blu-Ray.

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the-return-of-dan-reid

James Abbott has been riding along with this blog for years. He and I often get into back-and-forth email exchanges, usually about The Lone Ranger. In one of our recent “conversations,” he hit upon some stuff worth sharing with everybody, so I asked him to expand it into a post. He graciously agreed. Check out his blog The Jade Sphinx sometime.

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When I first stumbled on The Lone Ranger, it was love at first sight. And I’m not alone — the character has been an enduring icon and source of inspiration ever since he first appeared in 1933. There are few characters as familiar or beloved, and I think it fitting at the start of a New Year to talk about Lone Ranger and his place in the American mythos.

Born in 1962, I grew up during the great nostalgia craze of the 1960s and 70s. I stayed up late to watch Buster Crabbe as Buck Rogers, read reprints of Little Orphan Annie and Doc Savage, and saw the Marx Brothers on the big screen in revival houses. Great recordings from the 30s and 40s were reissued, and it’s not surprising that the first concert I ever went to was Bing Crosby when he played the Uris Theater in New York. It wasn’t that everything old was new again; for me, it was just new.

lone-ranger-radioThe big discovery for me, of course, was Old Time Radio. The local station, WRVR-FM, had a nightly rotation of vintage shows, and I was spellbound. The lineup included The Shadow, Fibber McGee and Molly, Gangbusters, The Green Hornet and … The Lone Ranger. In the first bloom of friendship, “those thrilling days of yesteryear” were both the 1930s and 40s, and the Old West.

The Lone Ranger was created by writer Fran Striker (1903-1962) and he first appeared in 1933 on radio station WXYZ, owned by George W. Trendle (1884-1972), who also claimed credit for creating the Ranger. The show was an enormous hit – it was geared towards kids, but more than half of the audience was made up of adults. The show would last on radio until 1954 – but, as is often the case, the Lone Ranger was to ride again in a television show from 1949 to 1957. The Lone Ranger was also the subject of two movie serials, four motion pictures (and, yes, I loved the Disney film), and one execrable TV movie.

lone-ranger-comic-panel

I came to the Lone Ranger long before I came to my great love of the Wild West, but he still encapsulates everything that is big, heroic and inspirational about the West.

Back in the early 70s, I listened every week. I bought cassette tapes of other episodes. I bought records featuring new recordings of radio star Brace Beemer retelling the origin (or creation myth) of the Ranger, Tonto and Silver, and the end of Butch Cavendish. And then, when the local television station started playing the Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels television version, I felt as if I were reuniting with old friends.

unnamed-2It was a friendship built to last. For nearly 25 years, a portrait of the Lone Ranger hung in my office, and as I write these words, a statue of him astride a rearing Silver stands on my desk.

So, the Ranger has been a constant in my life for as long as I can remember. But … why? What is it about the Lone Ranger and Tonto that has made them my trusted companions for more than 40 years?

I will be the first to admit that there was as much corn as gold in our Golden Age of Pop Culture. However… there is something about the Lone Ranger that still resonates, still has the capacity to touch some more innocent and hopeful self. And I say without shame and certainly without irony that I love him and continue to be inspired by him.

The Lone Ranger is a remarkable creation for a number of reasons. First off, Striker and company hit some kind of nerve in creating a kiddie show character that so resonated with adults. To understand the Lone Ranger’s popularity at the time with both children and adults, think of our contemporary obsession with Batman – and then realize that the Lone Ranger was even more popular in his prime.

The Lone Ranger, however, has no superpowers. What makes him special is his ethical approach to everything and everyone, the exercise of his superior moral code. The Lone Ranger has always been my hero because I could aspire to be like him – in fact, I wanted to be like him. It was an ideal that I wanted because he made me a better, rather than a more powerful, person. The Lone Ranger is all the things that America once told Americans about themselves, the personification of the decency and simple integrity first found in our frontier forebears, and still residing in us today.

The Lone Ranger was not “in it” for the money. In fact, it seems as if the Lone Ranger and Tonto lived on the road, camping outside of town. He did not help people for personal fame or self-aggrandizement; in fact, he always left before anyone could properly thank him. Finally, the Ranger made life better for those around him, and that seemed to be his sole motivation.

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The Lone Ranger was also a role-model in how to conduct a deep friendship. Though many misremember Tonto as a monosyllabic stooge, Tonto actually was the Ranger’s superior in woodcraft and outdoorsmanship, and was an excellent scout and information resource. More often than not, it was Tonto who did the initial reconnaissance and told the Ranger who and where the villains could be found. The Lone Ranger and Tonto form a true friendship – both men cared for and loved each other. (As is often the case with these long-lasting sagas, there is some debate as to how the two actually met. The current story is that they were boyhood friends and it was chance that brought Tonto to Bryant’s Gap after the ambush. Each man calls the other Kemo Sabe, which means “faithful friend.”)

page088The people helped by the Lone Ranger and Tonto often reacted as if they were suddenly brought face-to-face with a great living, breathing All-American myth. And they were! Part of the Ranger’s power as a character is that he is larger-than-life, but built on human dimensions. His appearances had all the trapping of an angelic visitation – but he always left a silver bullet behind so you knew it all really happened.

The Lone Ranger’s moral code meant that he never took a life, never shot to kill, never took unfair advantage. Today, a concept like that would never fly, but the Ranger comes from different times and a different America – a more aspirational land when we wanted people to emulate rather than feel smugly superior.

The Lone Ranger code was:

I believe…

That to have a friend, a man must be one.

That all men are created equal and that everyone has within himself the power to make this a better world.

That God put the firewood there, but that every man must gather and light it himself.

In being prepared physically, mentally, and morally to fight when necessary for that which is right.

That a man should make the most of what equipment he has.

That ‘this government of the people, by the people, and for the people’ shall live always.

That men should live by the rule of what is best for the greatest number.

That sooner or later…somewhere…somehow…we must settle with the world and make payment for what we have taken.

That all things change but truth, and that truth alone, lives on forever.

In my Creator, my country, my fellow man.

You can learn a lot about a people by the stories they tell about themselves. They don’t have to be true … they just have to be how a people think of and see themselves. At one time, Americans saw the Lone Ranger, and saw themselves.

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I could never be like the Lone Ranger. I am, at heart, not as inherently kind, as unfailingly generous, as expansive of heart as the Ranger. I have grown too cynical in too many ways, and life has managed to throw me too many curves. But the hope – the expectation – that I could, maybe on a good day, be a little more like him continues to be as strong as ever.

lone-ranger-badge-df001_bigThat part of me has been hiding in there somewhere for 54 years, and shows no sign of leaving yet. And as the New Year is upon us, and people writing up their New Year Resolutions, I keep thinking, What Would the Lone Ranger Do? It would make a great ethical compass with which to live by.

The creators of the Lone Ranger wanted to create a myth that was actively striving to live larger than all of us, to be both an ideal and an inspiration. And though no one could really live up to the impossibly high bar of moral behavior the Ranger erects, it is certainly something to work towards.

Who was that Masked Man? He was the best part of ourselves.

And so, on to 2017. Hi-yo Silver, away!

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lone-ranger-color-title

Here’s a great way to spend half an hour of your Christmas Eve — the 1956 (color) holiday episode of The Lone Ranger, “Christmas Story.”

It was directed by Earl Bellamy, who did episodes of nearly every TV show known to man. It stars Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels, of course. Aline Towne, who plays Mrs. Talbot, has a great list of 50s credits, — from Republic stuff like Rough Riders Of Durango (1951) and Radar Men From The Moon (1952) to TV ranging from M Squad to Maverick to Leave It To Beaver.

Click on the title card and it’s “Hi-yo Silver, away!”

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