Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘John Wayne’ Category

wayne348

It’s not a 50s Western, but two of our favorites are in it, and this saloon fight has to be one of the best ever filmed. So, to commemorate this blog reaching 1,000,000 hits, here’s John Wayne and Randolph Scott in The Spoilers (1942). They might not reach a million hits in this six-minute sequence, but they certainly beat the crap out of each other.

To each and every one of you behind all those hits here at 50 Westerns From The 50s, my sincere thanks. I never imagined this crazy thing would ever see such a milestone.

So, to celebrate, and to honor my all-time favorite actor, Randolph Scott, let’s have another Trivia Contest. The question will appear, as a new post, tomorrow at noon (Eastern Standard Time).

Read Full Post »

Angie-Dickinson-between-Rio-Bravo

Here’s wishing Angie Dickinson a happy birthday. Of course, I’m gonna offer up a photo of her on the set of my favorite Western, Rio Bravo (1959).

Howard Hawks gives the film such a cool, friendly vibe, and the performances are so good, that I feel like I’ve known its characters all my life.

Read Full Post »

Let’s Go Dodgers!

Wayne clothier alamo

Here’s the great cinematographer William H. Clothier and John Wayne on the set of The Alamo (1960). I love this photo and have been waiting for a chance to use it: the Dodgers heading into the post season seems like a good reason.

Read Full Post »

Roy Rogers drinks

My wife came across these the other day. Keep a look out for ‘em—the Lasso Lemon Lime is terrific.

Of course, there’s also Duke Bourbon.

Read Full Post »

andrew-v-mclaglen2

Andrew Victor McLaglen
(28 July 28, 1920 – 30 August 2014)

Andrew V. McLaglen, the son of actor Victor McLaglen, was a prolific director who got the kind of apprenticeship any filmmaker would envy: after growing up on his dad’s movie sets, he was made assistant director on John Ford’s The Quiet Man (1952). McLaglen worked on a number of films from John Wayne’s Batjac (he co-produced Seven Men From Now) and got his first directing credit for the company’s Gun The Man Down (1956).

The late 50s and early 60s saw lots of TV work—including 116 episodes of Have Gun-Will Travel—with a feature from time to time. It was usually Westerns. McLintock! (1963). The Rare Breed (1966, above, with Maureen O’Hara). The Way West (1967). In the 70s, he was John Wayne’s director of choice.

Mr. McLaglen passed away at 94. He will probably be known for McLintock! and Shenandoah (1965), two films that showed what he was capable of.

Read Full Post »

searchers webb ad

This is as close as I could get to tying Jack Webb to a 50s Western—The Searchers (1956) paired with a short Webb appeared in. (Of course, there’s also his ex-wife Julie London in Man Of The West (1958), among others.)

Anyway, over at my other blog, The Hannibal 8, I’m putting together a Jack Webb Blogathon, a celebration of his innovative, influential and just plain cool body of work. If you’re interesting in joining the force, I’d love to have you.

Read Full Post »

Hellfire TC

So far, the great cinematographer Jack A. Marta has hardly been mentioned here. I’m ashamed and with today’s Wild Bill Wednesday, I’m taking care of it. So many outstanding movies. What Price Glory (1926). The Night Riders (1939). Dark Command (1940). Flying Tigers (1942). Hellfire (1949). Trigger, Jr. (1950). Spoilers Of The Plains (1951). The Last Command (1955). The Bonnie Parker Story (1958). Cat Ballou (1965). Duel (1971).

On that last one, Steven Spielberg’s breakthrough TV movie Duel, Marta’s experience shooting outdoors in the desert helped get the thing completed on its 10-day schedule.

Steven Spielberg (from the excellent book Steven Spielberg And Duel: The Making Of A Film Career): “Jack was a sweetheart. He was just a kind, gentle soul who you know had never worked that fast in his entire career; none of us had, and yet there was nothing he didn’t do or couldn’t do, and he really enjoyed himself.”

No offense to Mr. Spielberg, but I have a feeling Duel‘s 10-day shoot, though exhausting, was probably nothing new for Marta, who’d done beautiful work on Republic’s tight schedules, in both black and white and Trucolor, and worked on plenty of television shows like Route 66 and Batman.

When Elliott co-produced Hellfire (below) for Republic release, a film he saw as a very special project (and considered his best film), Jack Marta was the director of photography. Was he randomly assigned the job by Republic, or did Elliott request him after working together on The Gallant Legion (1948) and the Trucolor The Last Bandit (1949)? (I’m getting pretty good at finding new ways to sneak Hellfire into this blog.)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 171 other followers